Tag Archives: Japan

EC 2016 – Results — nadin4eblog

Adults Women -­50Kg 1 Violeta Litovska Bulgaria 2 Justina Sisaite Lithuania 3 Sandra Nowak Poland 3 Eider Cardenosa Spain Adults Women 50­-55Kg 1 Zsofia Szabo Hungary 2 Isis Pinilla Spain 3 Marta Lubos Poland 3 Veronika Nemeth Hungary Adults Women 55­-60Kg 1 Inga Mikstaite Lithuania 2 Gabija Gudeliauskaite Lithuania 3 Lidia Kormondi Hungary 3 Tamar […]

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Meiji Jingu — yin yang student

Shinto is called Japan’s ancient original religion, and it is deeply rooted in the way of Japanese life. Shinto has no known founder or single sacred scripture. Shinto is wholly devoted to life in this world and emphasizes man’s essential goodness. The name Shinto comes from Chinese characters for Shen(‘divine being’), and Tao (‘way’) and […]

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The skill Of Shootfighting — Bloggie

Due to it is most certainly very provocative martial art, Shootfighting will still be possibly the most popular martial arts styles on the earth. The art of Shootfighting is amazingly old, originating from Japan as a means of fighting. Though it is a good thing to use for self defense purposes, this martial art is […]

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Jigen-Ryu Swordsmanship, by a New York City-based Japanese Kenjutsu Master, 1903. PART 2.

Martial Arts New York

“As a method of physical training, an indispensable part of the culture of the civilized, [the art of swordplay] may still be regarded as an important and, perhaps, one of the most highly developed arts…”

Continued from PART I.

On September 10, 1901, the following announcement appeared in Japan and America, a magazine based at 203 Broadway, New York City:

The famous Japanese fencer, Tatewaki K. Kawasaki, of the “Jigen-ryu” school, who was studying in A. M. Chesbrough Seminary, North Chili, has returned to this city [New York]. He is writing a series of articles in English on his singular sword play, with the view to disclose it to Western fencers and athletes, as well as to the American public.

Tatewaki Kawasaki was one of the first, if not the first, master of Japanese sword technique to write extensively about his art for an American audience. The first of Kawasaki’s articles appeared in…

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Jigen-Ryu Swordsmanship, by a New York City-based Japanese Kenjutsu Master, 1903

Martial Arts New York

“Fencing, of course, is well known in New York, but our method is entirely different…”

On September 10, 1901, the following announcement appeared in Japan and America, a magazine based at 203 Broadway, New York City:

The famous Japanese fencer, Tatewaki K. Kawasaki, of the “Jigen-ryu” school, who was studying in A. M. Chesbrough Seminary, North Chili, has returned to this city [New York]. He is writing a series of articles in English on his singular sword play, with the view to disclose it to Western fencers and athletes, as well as to the American public.

Above: Kawasaki in the Omaha Daily Bee, 1906. Source: Library of Congress. Kawasaki in the Omaha Daily Bee, 1906.

According to the New York Press, Tatewaki K. Kawasaki had taken “a classical course at a school neear Rochester,” New York, and had taken European fencing from Camero Negroni, before arriving in New York City, where he would “introduce the Japanese method of sword combat.”

The public…

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Sumo wrestling!

sashawd

So I saw my first Sumo tournament on Sunday and looking back on it now it was a pretty strange experience. It’s such an odd sport that I don’t really know what to say about it really, other than it was pretty intriguing watching really fat man be very violent with each other and try to push each over/ out of a ring for three hours! What struck me the most was the preparation that lead up to each fight, there was much throwing of salt, stretching and staring at each other (all part of a religious Shinto ritual apparently which is where Sumo has its roots) before each fight would begin and then the fight would often be over in seconds. Not really knowing anything about the sumo wrestlers me and Nic just took random bets on who would win which was quite fun and we guessed who the…

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